Twitch will now delete DMCA violating clips without warning

Twitch

October 22, 2020 We have since received an official statement through from a Twitch spokesperson regarding the story below: “We are incredibly proud of the essential service Twitch has become for so many artists and songwriters, especially during this challenging time. It is crucial that we protect the rights of songwriters, artists and other music industry partners. We continue to develop tools and resources to further educate our creators and empower them with more control over their content while partnering with industry-recognised vendors in the copyright space to help us achieve these goals.”

Last night, while AOC was cooking up a storm by becoming one of the most watched streamers on Twitch, the streaming platform confirmed that it will now be automatically deleting clips and VODs that violate DMCA rules. This confirmation was tweeted shortly after Twitch sent out a wave of emails to streamers.

Spotted by esports consultant Rod ‘Slasher’ Breslau, the email was sent to partnered streamers, saying “We are writing to inform you that your channel was subject to one or more of these DMCA takedown notifications, and that the content identified has been deleted. We recognize that by deleting this content, we are not giving you the option to file a counter-notification or seek a retraction from the rights holder.

“In consideration of this, we have processed these notifications and are issuing you a one-time warning to give you the chance to learn about copyright law and the tools available to manage the content on your channel.” DMCA notices have become a hot topic in the Twitch community following an initial wave earlier this year that threatened streamers with permanent channel bans.

What’s new, and somewhat troubling, is that Twitch will be taking the reins when it comes to removing DMCA violating clips and VODs from its platform.

Plenty of criticism has been made about the latest move and how it has been handled so far. Apparently streamers are not being told which clips or VODs specifically received a DMCA claim, and the move to automatically delete them does not give streamers the opportunity to file a counter claim.

Twitter user KoploperMau probably put it best, asking “Why don’t I get the chance to review all content on my channel that received a DMCA claim? Where is the list with claims, so I can take action to mute or delete stuff myself? Do you think I’m gonna watch 3 years worth of streams to find all infringing content?”

All of these are valid questions and we have reached out to Twitch for a response to streamers concerns.